Infant Reflexes are Quizlet 22 Important Infant Reflexes

Infant Reflexes

Today we are here to tell about infant reflexes are Quizlet. Infant reflexes are involuntary movements or responses that are present in newborns and young infants. These reflexes are a normal part of development and help infants to survive and adapt to their environment. Here are some common infant reflexes:

Rooting Reflex

The rooting reflex is the infant’s natural tendency to turn their head toward anything that touches their cheek or mouth. This Infant Reflexes helps infants to find their mother’s nipple and begin feeding.

Sucking Reflex

The sucking reflex is the infant’s automatic response to anything that touches the roof of their mouth. This Infant Reflexes helps infants to begin feeding and is essential for their survival.

Grasping Reflex

The grasping reflex is the infant’s natural tendency to grip anything that touches the palm of their hand. This Infant Reflexes helps infants to hold onto objects, such as their mother’s finger, and is a precursor to developing fine motor skills.

Moro Reflex

The Moro reflex is the infant’s automatic response to being startled or dropped suddenly. This reflex is characterized by the infant extending their arms, legs, and fingers and then bringing them back in, often accompanied by crying.

 

Infant Reflexes
Infant Reflexes

 

Babinski Reflex

The Babinski reflex is the infant’s natural tendency to fan out their toes and curl them in response to stroking the sole of their foot. This reflex is a sign of normal development and should disappear by around 12 months of age.

Tonic Neck Reflex

The Tonic Neck reflex, also known as the “fencing” reflex, is the infant’s tendency to turn their head to one side and extend the arm and leg on that side while flexing the opposite arm and leg. This reflex helps infants to begin developing coordination and balance.

Stepping Reflex

The Stepping reflex is the infant’s tendency to lift their feet and step when held upright with their feet touching a surface. This reflex helps infants to develop their leg muscles and prepare for walking.

Palmar Grasp Reflex

The Palmar Grasp reflex is the infant’s tendency to grip with their hand when pressure is applied to their palm. This reflex is present from birth and usually disappears around 6 months of age.

Plantar Grasp Reflex

The Plantar Grasp reflex is the infant’s tendency to curl their toes when pressure is applied to the sole of their foot. This reflex is present at birth and usually disappears around 9 months of age.

Asymmetric Tonic Neck Reflex

The Asymmetric Tonic Neck Reflex, or “ATNR,” is the infant’s tendency to turn their head to one side while extending the arm and leg on that side and flexing the opposite arm and leg. This reflex is typically present from birth to 4 months of age and is thought to be important for developing hand-eye coordination.

Galant Reflex

The Galant Reflex is the infant’s tendency to move their hips toward the side that is stroked or touched. This reflex is present from birth and usually disappears around 6 months of age.

Tongue Thrust Reflex

The Tongue Thrust Reflex is the infant’s tendency to push their tongue forward when something is placed in their mouth. This reflex is present from birth and usually disappears around 4-6 months of age.

Blinking Reflex

The Blinking Reflex is the infant’s tendency to blink in response to bright lights or sudden movements. This reflex is present from birth and is an important protective mechanism for the eyes.

Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex

The Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex, or “TLR,” is the infant’s tendency to extend their legs and arch their back when lying on their back, and to flex their legs and curl up when lying on their stomach. This reflex is present from birth and usually disappears around 6 months of age.

Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex

The Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex, or “STNR,” is the infant’s tendency to flex their head and arms while extending their legs when their head is bent forward, and to extend their head and arms while flexing their legs when their head is bent backward. This reflex is typically present from 6-9 months of age and is thought to be important for developing crawling and other motor skills.

Crossed Extension Reflex

The Crossed Extension Reflex is the infant’s tendency to extend the leg on the opposite side when the sole of their foot is firmly stroked. This reflex is present from birth and is thought to be important for developing walking and balance.

Glabellar Reflex

The Glabellar Reflex is the infant’s tendency to blink repeatedly when their forehead is tapped lightly. This reflex is present from birth and usually disappears by around 4 months of age.

Phasic Bite Reflex

The Phasic Bite Reflex is the infant’s tendency to open and close their mouth rhythmically when pressure is applied to the gums. This Infant Reflexes is present from birth and is thought to be important for developing feeding skills.

Moro Reflex

The Moro Reflex is the infant’s tendency to extend their arms, legs, and fingers, and then quickly bring them back to their body when they experience a sudden change in position or sensation. This reflex is typically present from birth to 4 months of age and is thought to be important for developing a sense of balance and security.

Rooting Reflex

The Rooting Reflex is the infant’s tendency to turn their head and open their mouth in response to touching or stroking their cheek or mouth. This reflex is present from birth and is important for initiating feeding.

Stepping Reflex

The Stepping Reflex is the infant’s tendency to make stepping movements when their feet touch a flat surface. This reflex is present from birth and disappears around 2-3 months of age. It is thought to be important for developing walking skills.

Babinski Reflex

The Babinski Reflex is the infant’s tendency to fan out their toes and curl them when the sole of their foot is stroked. This reflex is present from birth and usually disappears around 12 months of age.

Conclusion

Infant reflexes are important for normal development and can provide valuable information about an infant’s overall health and well-being. Some reflexes are present from birth, while others emerge during the first few months of life. Understanding and observing these reflexes can help parents and healthcare providers to monitor an infant’s progress and identify any potential developmental delays or issues. If a Infant Reflexes persists beyond the typical age range or if an infant does not exhibit a reflex at the expected time, further evaluation may be needed.

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